Ruhr-Uni-Bochum

Vipul Goyal (Carnegie Mellon University)

"Fast Communication Efficient Secure Multi-Party Computation"

Copyright: Vipul Goyal

Treffpunkt: Gebäude TZR ("MB"), Level 1, Room SM-MW-106, Universitätsstraße 142, 44799 Bochum
Alternativ: Zum Zoom-Webinar (Code: 946428) 

Abstract: Secure Multi-Party Computation (MPC) is a framework where multiple parties collaborate to compute a common function of their interest without revealing their private inputs to each other. MPC is a very general cryptographic tool and is useful in diverse situations such as privacy preserving machine learning, secure auctions, and voting. While the feasibility of MPC has been known for several decades, the key challenge is making these protocols efficient. In this talk, Vipul Goyal will describe some of his recent work in making MPC more communication efficient. We focus on the so called information theoretic setting where security doesn't rely on unproven cryptographic assumptions (such as factoring). Instead he assume that a constant fraction of the parties behave honestly. This is natural in settings such as Blockchains or voting. We will rely on a tool called packed secret sharing which allows one to run the circuit computation faster by handling a "batch of gates" at a time instead of a single gate.

Biography: Vipul Goyal is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and a Senior Scientist at NTT Research, CA. Previously, he was a researcher in the Cryptography and Complexity group at Microsoft Research, India. He received his PhD in Computer Science from the University of California in December 2009. Dr. Goyal is a winner of several honors including a 2019 JP Morgan Faculty Research Award, 2016 ACM CCS Test-of-Time Award, a Microsoft Research graduate fellowship, and, a Google outstanding graduate student award. He was named to the Forbes magazine 30 under 30 list of people changing science and healthcare in 2013. His research has received media coverage at popular science publications such as MIT Technology Reviews, Slashdot, and, Nature News. He has given invited lectures at places such as MIT, Princeton, and, IIT Delhi. Goyal has served on program committees of conferences such as Crypto, Eurocrypt and ACM CCS. Also he has published over 80 technical papers at top conferences in cryptography such as at Crypto, Eurocrypt, STOC, FOCS, and, ACM CCS.